Department of Ophthalmology




The First Year of Residency

Residents:
» Dr. Aldo Espinoza
» Dr. Jordan Patton
» Dr. Kathryn Shmunes
Highlights:
» First assistant in cataract surgery
» Multi-specialty exposure
» Call with full senior coverage for first 2 months
» Early involvement with laser procedures
» Wetlab taught by faculty and seniors
» Emergency clinic integrated with faculty clinics
» Dedicated research time on certain rotation blocks

At the earliest convenience the department coordinates a breakfast meet and greet for the new residents. Most of the staff, technicians, secretarial staff, residents and faculty attend with introductions being made and the new residents are welcomed aboard. After the summer heat cools off Dr. Nussbaum holds a barbeque at his house for all the residents, their spouses and kids as well as the rest of the department.

Shortly after the breakfast get together the program director and the chairman have separate meetings with the group of incoming residents. The chief resident and residency coordinator guide them through a number of meetings (clinic manager, billing coordinator, physicians assistant, photographer, etc.) to orient the residents to the department and services offered. After this initial orientation to the Ophthalmology Department the first year residents are taken through a 2 week course of instruction in the techniques of ocular examination and an overview of common ocular pathologies by senior residents and faculty. The format includes: lectures, demonstrations, and observation in clinic. As this course concludes the resident will enter into their own continuity and faculty subspecialty clinics. We make an effort to rotate the first year residents to a certain extent through most of the subspecialty clinics including: general, glaucoma, contact lens, retina, peds, and cornea. A few of the clinics are procedure oriented with a focus on minor procedures, e.g. chalazion excision, YAG capsulotomy, and laser peripheral iridotomy. During after hours call emergency outpatient procedures, e.g. lid lacerations are also a part of the first year experience.

As first year residents (PGY-2) a significant proportion of time will be spent in running the emergency/on-call clinic. Beginning in July 2010 these clinics were restructured so that they would be a part of the faculty clinics. This was done to improve the educational experience, improve patient care and facilitate throughput by limiting a tendency to get bogged down if the volume gets heavy. Nightly and weekend first call is taken every 3rd night. This begins on July 1st (even if a weekend day); however, for a designated time frame(usually first 2 months) the backup senior resident is required to be present on all after hours patient visits. In the initial phase the senior resident will present at the same time as the first year to guide them through the process. Subsequent to this the senior will come in after the first year has seen the patient. Gradually, the first year is released to perform more on their own. It is expected that there will always be available supervision or backup.